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Scott Francis Baker


April 20th, 2002

All you need is a rocket launcher and a nice set of tits @ 10:40 pm

Did the MS walk this morning... We got to downtown and we had to park in the Smart Park because we couldn't find street parking. Well someone covered up the S and the M from Smart with a post-it note and wrote F instead. It was comic genius... I still can't get over it... Fart Park :)

Walked 10k which is just a little over six miles. It wasn't very hard at all. Walking is easy, even uphill. After I walk a while I noticed that my legs/thighs really started to itch. Not really sure why. Half of the way I was scratching my legs which sort of made it suck. It stopped after a while and then the walk was over.

McDonalds sponsored the event and at the end gave out hamburgers to everyone. Nothing like a McDonalds hamburger after you've got your blood pumping. *puke*
 
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From:potsie
Date:April 21st, 2002 02:05 am (UTC)
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This happens to me too. There are several possible causes of itchy legs while walking. This seems to be a common complaint in new walkers and it has been suggested that the itching may be due to poor circulation. If this is the case the itching normally subsides as your body gets more activity.

Of course the most common cause of itchy legs is dry skin. In the winter dry skin can really be a problem. You may itch when you're not exercising, but sweating intensifies the problem. Simply apply a moisturizer to your legs before exercising. Use products that are free of perfumes and dyes.

Some soaps, detergents, fabrics, etc. can cause a slight allergic reaction. Once again you may not really notice this until you are walking and sweating. If you are using a new product (bath soap, lotion, laundry detergent, etc) that could be the culprit. Also be sure you are wearing breathable fabrics to reduce chances of a heat rash.

If the itching persists, you develop a rash, or have additional symptoms you should contact a physician.

Scott Francis Baker